6 Nightly Steps to Dental Hygiene
N.B. According to "The Costco Connection" (and other sources such as
www.webmd.com), in their Health Trivia section
: "People who suffer from gum disease
are twice as likely to have a stroke or heart attack"
Fabric Collage
Watermedia
Other Art
Contact Drina
About Drina
HOME PAGE
Fabric Collage
Watermedia
Other Art
Contact Drina
About Drina
HOME PAGE
                                           6 Nightly Steps to Dental Hygiene

Nightly doing each of these 6 steps combined gets rid of that biofilm and tartar even better (also known
as "calculus". For years I brushed well, used a water irrigator, flossed, and swished and held
mouthwash in my mouth.
When I incorporated ALL 6 steps my dentist noticed complete remission. Yes,
it does take about 15 minutes nightly
;  taking a bit longer when you’re first starting this ritual, and doing
it thoroughly,
than it does when you’re used to doing it.

Step 1.
My "hummingbird" Oral B stimulator vibrates. There are other brands but you might have to go online to
find any at all. I place it for 1 second on the side of each tooth. ( It takes less than a minute.
The tips need replacing, but there's nothing wrong with using each tip until it won't clean well. )

Step 2.
Use a good water powered irrigator to flush out more food particles and bacteria; also helps stimulate
gums, adding help a little differently than step one. Work up to the highest setting. (about 45 seconds)

Step 3.
Battery powered toothbrushes feel good and make the job easier. I use Oral B battery
powered. (about 2 minutes) if you’re wondering about fluoride versus other toothpaste you may want to
experiment with the new toothpaste that include xylitol and Essential Oils, which I think avoids the issue
of neurotoxicity of using fluoride. Also Xylitol is said to remineralize small cavities could be developing.

Step 4.
Floss. I use Glide - but “they“ suggest that the teflon-like Glide is not as good as others – which I haven’t
been able to easily find (1-2 minutes) Your hygienist will show you how to manipulate the string ( use
about 18 inches here) if you need more instruction.

Step 5.
Scale away plaque. I use a scaler or dull "explorer". (This is the longest step, scraping
carefully slightly under the gumline on the inside and outside of each tooth, grabbing even more of the
slime/tartar and biofilm. I do this while looking into a large magnifying mirror, and holding a tissue in my
other hand to wipe off the gunk as I go.  If you were to choose to skip days, you would eventually find
portions that have calcified into tartar, making gingivitis and bleeding very likely . (takes about 5-8
minutes total, after one is used to the procedure). Dental offices might not like you doing this step
because it somewhat usurps their job; yet it is what really made the difference to save my teeth. They
also might imply you’re incapable of doing it. Really???

Step 6.
Finish with an antibacterial mouthwash that tastes good to you, preferably one not containing alcohol.
By using a side delivering tip on a "pocket" irrigator ( from dental supply house or online- see drawing
above ).  I place the mouthwash right where it needs to go---on and when possible under the gumline. I
used to use Therasol, but now I only use a teaspoon of therasol put into the Step 2 water irrigation tub.  
Now I use Life Extension‘s mouthwash to finish the nightly steps because of its Xylitol and essential oil
ingredients. ( To repeat, xylitol is said to remineralize tiny cavities that are beginning.) Other healthy
mouthwashes are showing up on the market. If you can’t find a pocket irrigator you can just hold the
mouthwash and swish it in your mouth for a minute or so, giving it a chance to linger on your teeth .
Lately I’m experimenting with dipping the tip of my Explorer into a little pot of mouthwash as I do Step 5;
scraping out the hidden plaque around each tooth. So far it works for me.

   This is done at night, so don't eat until the next day or even drink water for at least 15 minutes.

Thus by getting rid of 98%-99.9% of the plaque - that soft, sticky biofilm which contains bacteria and
forms daily on the teeth and a little under the gums/gingiva- you get rid of the problem. If you wait until
the soft film tends to harden to form tartar/calculus - you've  hurried receding gums and disease.
   
According to "The Costco Connection" (and other sources such as
WebMD - Better information. Better health.), in their Health Trivia section: "People who suffer from gum
disease are twice as likely to have a stroke or heart attack"
.
A
s said above, although periodontal disease is the second most common disease of humans, (#1The
most prevalent
being the common cold.) gingivitis- which is redness/inflammation and bleeding of the
gums when brushed, etc. is the
first stage of periodontal disease; inflamed gum tissue around the
teeth. If there is any bleeding, gums start to recede as it tries to get away (as it were) from the bacteria
and dental plaque. If it bleeds
, that area needs more stimulation, not less stimulation, and it needs
removal of the film to heal it. Leaving it alone just keeps the disease progressing. Waiting for a
cleaning in the dentist's office 2
, 4, or even 6 times yearly, in my opinion, leaves you open to
unnecessary dental disease.
    
        
Drina's first college degree was in dental hygiene.  While working as a dental hygienist, Drina then worked herself through
more college, majoring in psychology .

Periodontal disease is the second most common disease of  humans. (#1The most prevalent disease is the common cold.)  
Loss of teeth in one spot leads to problems with the opposing teeth, and eventually the loss of more teeth. Appearance and
digestion changes as cheeks sink in and food isn't chewed or enjoyed as much.  Finally, dentures cause a whole set of other
discomforts as well as wearing away the bone ridge, over years,  making it harder to keep dentures in place.
I want people to realize that brushing and flossing only isn't enough to completely remove dental plaque thereby staving off
gingivitis. Gingivitis- redness or bleeding of the gums is the first stage of periodontal disease; inflamed gum tissue around their
teeth. If there is any bleeding- it's likely to be gingivitis.  When the tissue bleeds it starts to recede as it tries to get away (as it were)
from the bacteria and "gunk" (eventually hardening into calculus) found in dental plaque. If it bleeds it needs more stimulation, not
less, and removal of the film to heal it.    Leaving it alone just keeps the disease progressing. Waiting for a cleaning in the dentist's
office 2-4 times yearly, in my opinion, leaves you open to unnecessary dental disease. By getting rid of 99.9% the plaque - that soft,
sticky film which contains bacteria and forms daily on the teeth and gums- you get rid of the problem. (Gingiva is the
dental word
for gums). If you wait  the soft film tends to harden to form calculus
, also known as tartar - and further hurries  receding gums and
disease.    
 

Nightly doing each of these 6 steps combined gets rid of that insideous slime and "calculus". For years I brushed well, used a
water irrigator, flossed, and  swished and held mouthwash in my mouth. Still when I was in my late 30's there were pockets of
periodontal disease.   It wasn't until I incorporated ALL these 6 steps that my dentist noticed complete remission. Yes, it does take
the setting up and about 15 minutes nightly, so I just do the teeth I want to save. SO yes, I do them ALL.

The morning ritual for me is quick and simple: my battery powered toothbrushing and I held a capful of hydrogen peroxide in my
teeth area for about a minute as it seems to do a good job of sweetening the breath and making my teeth white for my age.  I don't
eat or drink for about 15 minutes after using mouthwash or peroxide. Since 2014 there has been the question of killing good
mouth bacteria that may help prevent heart problems. Therefore, I NOW reserve the hydrogen peroxide mouthwash only for special
occasions.

this page (6 nightly steps to Dental Hygiene) was inspired by an advertisement assignment  during a College of
Southern Nevada CSN art course (from professor Alfonso Lirani).